Benefits you're entitled to: the over-50s

1 April 2015
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Are you struggling to make ends meet? You'll be surprised at the financial support on offer in the lead-up to retirement and beyond.

According to older people's charity, Age UK, nearly three million people over 65 are struggling financially, while government figures show that 1.9 million pensioners are on a low income. Despite this, the benefits targeted at older people are the most likely to go unclaimed.

The government estimates that up to 1.4 million pensioners do not claim one of the most important benefits for the retired - pension credit - with up to £3.3 billion unclaimed every year. The average amount unclaimed is significant – £2,000 per family, according to the Department for Work and Pensions. Other benefits that also go unclaimed by older people include housing benefit and council tax benefit.

David Samson, welfare benefits expert at the Turn2us benefits advice service, run by the Elizabeth Finn Trust, says that many pensioners are not aware of the financial support available to them. “For example, they may be getting their state pension but not be aware that they are entitled to pension credit,” he says. “The rules for pension credit are more generous than the rules for working people, so they may have an entitlement that they don’t realise.

"It’s important to get the message out there as we know that claiming the correct benefits can make a huge difference to quality of life."

Caroline Abrahams, charity director at Age UK, adds: “Despite millions of older people struggling financially, around £3.5 billion in money benefits remains unclaimed every year when this extra income could make a huge difference to their lives.”

The benefits that are on offer change as you get older – but some are available to people as young as 50-years-old.

Here is an overview of what you can claim in your 50s.

Benefits in your 50s

With people in the UK living longer than ever before and the state pension age rising, most people are expected to have many years of work in front of them when they turn 50.

However, the government is concerned about the number of people in their 50s who are unemployed and find it hard to seek work.  The unemployment rate for those aged 50 to 64 is now lower than the population as a whole, at 3% compared with 4.2% overall, according to the latest Labour Force survey, but there is evidence that those who lose their jobs later in life find it harder to find employment again.

There is some help for over 50s to get into work, with Job Centres sometimes offering specific advice for over 50s, including IT training, while older people are also eligible for the apprenticeship schemes and the New Enterprise Allowance for starting up their own businesses, subject to eligibility.

While you are in your 50s, you are also still eligible to claim jobseeker's allowance if you are looking for work. After you reach state pension age, this benefit is no longer available.

Jobseeker's Allowance

What is it?

Jobseeker's allowance (JSA) is a benefit for those who could work but who currently aren't and are looking for a job. The maximum amount you can get under JSA is £57.90 per week if you are under 25, £73.10 if you are 25 or over or £114.85 per week if you’re a couple both aged over 18.

How much might you get?

There are three different types of JSA, which we describe below. These rules apply to those living in England, Scotland or Wales – the eligibility rules are slightly different in Northern Ireland.

Income-based JSA, is means tested. You only get income-based JSA if your income and savings are low enough. If you have a partner they must either not be working, or working fewer than 24 hours a week, and you must be working for 16 hours a week or less. You must have £16,000 or less in savings. Income-based JSA is very variable, depending on savings, housing costs and other circumstances. It is calculated by comparing your income to an amount that the government considers enough to live on. You cannot receive income-based JSA and Universal Credit at the same time.

Contribution-based JSA, is not means tested, but is based on your Class 1 national insurance contributions. Contribution-based JSA is received for six months after becoming unemployed if you have paid enough National Insurance contributions.

New style JSA, works the same way as contribution-based JSA. It is available for those who can apply for the new universal credit. Currently this applies to single people living anywhere in England Wales or Scotland, or a couple or family living in an area where universal credit has been introduced.

Although you can get new style JSA at the same time as universal credit, it will be deducted from your universal credit payment.

Further information

  • Visit Turn2us.org.uk for a benefits calculator or call the freephone helpline on 0808 802 2000.
  • Contact Ageuk.org.uk for advice specifically aimed at older people or call the freephone number 0800 169 2081.

BENEFITS YOU'RE ENTITLED TO: THE OVER-60S

BENEFITS YOU'RE ENTITLED TO: STATE PENSION AGE

BENEFITS YOU'RE ENTITLED TO: THE OVER-65S

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

My bro-in-laws and his wife are vulnerable adults. They live on benefits, but try to save a little for "emergencies". They have been victims of pressure sales tactics involving central heating maintenance schemes and double glazing. The latest is funeral planning having been persuaded that their £5k contingency ( Cash ISA) is inadequate and require at least £10k each. About a year ago I persuaded them to put some savings into an HL shares ISA which I manage along with my own (£2k OEICs & £1k Aim). He has the shares, she has kept the cash Isa(£2k). Now here is the dilemma, they tell me that they can each hold £5k savings before it affects their benefits they are 64 & 63. His share ISA is now worth £4.8k - but in 3 months it could have gone up or down by £1,000. If it was a sluggish cash Isa I would tell him to draw out enough to ensure it does not hit £5k, and put it in his wife's ISA - but being a volatile shares ISA how do I decide when the £5k limit applies? 1. Do I base it on the offer, bid or midpoint share value?2. What if the portfolio is worth £5.1k in the morning and £4.9k by teatime?3. Maybe the key date is valuation at 31st March every tax year?4. There are HMRC rules for cash ISAs but where do I find the share ISA rules?Due to their difficulties, they are chuffed with the returns, and planing to move his "profits" to top up her cash but what bugs me is that they could be paying the funeral plan premiums into some safe(ish) OEICs if only I could get some straight answers on shares ISAs and their affect on benefits. Tried a number of agencies including Age Concern but no-one has a clue....... so far.Tia, Ray

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

i live with my partner who is in full time employment im looking for work can we claim anything

In reply to by Sophia (not verified)

You don't say which bills you cant pay, So I will start with credit card bills, You can phone up your credit card provider and state you are not in employment and they may at their discretion, suspend your payments for up to 6 months. Next your energy provider may put in a card meter for your power needs and add your outstanding debt, so that you can pay them back over months or years without being cut off. In all cases a sensible approach is to contact the person you owe money too and negotiate with them. Also citizens advice (cab) can advise you of your options regarding debt and ccj,s etc. Also the uk government official website can direct you and advise you of options available and is helpful.

In reply to by Mrs Dale Rodgers (not verified)

I am 56 yr old single women awaiting a hip replacement as i have a pension of £278.48 from my late husband's death i only get £39.46 uc this amount combine do not leave me with money for food after bill's can you advise

In reply to by margaret sloan (not verified)

Regarding Ms Sloan, since you are 64 years old you would be entitled to pension credit. The weekly amount is £164.00 per week.You can go online and apply or go to any jobcentre to get a phone number to apply on the phone.The rate for couple who are 63 years old and over is £240.00 per week.Hope this helps

Help....had psoriasis for 40 years so employment difficult

Worked hard all my life but because of psoriasis hard to find work. Not afraid of work! Done self employed. Done cleaning, kitchen assistant etc but now I’m nearly 61 no one wants to know! 4 wonderful kids (all working) 2 beautiful grandkids (too young to work)! Eldest served his country in RAF for 12 years and even he is struggling! I think I now have depression and as an ex mental-health worker that is crazy! What do I do? Please😰🤔🦋

not fit to work

I have worked all my life I am 64 now and feel I am not fit to work anymore I am quite ill what help can I get .

Pensions

These comments are heartbreaking
People who have worked all their lives are really struggling and just being ignored if they have financial difficulties
Why bother even putting the over fifty section in, there is no assistance there at all if you need it
How is this a civillised society treating people this way?
Return pensions to sixty for women and men too if they need to retire and a minimum of £200 a week its cruelty to leave things as they are
After all Thats only the price of a meal out for your average m p
There seems to be money for vanity projects and immigrants after all

CLAIMING CARER,S ALLOWANCE. .

I GET A SMALL BIT ADDED FROM INCOME SUPPORT. IS THAT ALL I CAN CLAIM £63.00P. PER WEEK.?? I USE TO GET A PREMIUM. BUT FOR SOME REASON THEY WILL NOT SAY WHAT. THEY STOPPED IT. IS THIS RIGHT. I AM DIVORCED. I WAS MARRIED FOR 29. YEAR,S. I WANTED THE SETTLEMENT SPLIT DOWN THE MIDDLE. HIS SOLICITOR SAID HE WILL GIVE YOU A LARG SUM OF MONEY. WE WERE SHARED OWNER,S OF OUR HOUSE. THAT,S WERE IT WENT. I AM LIVING IN POVERTY. WHAT WENT WRONG.?? PLEASE HELP. HE GET,S TWO PENSION,S. I GET NOTHING ONLY £63.00P PER WEEK. THIS CANNOT BE RIGHT.

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