Fight for your rights: I’ve been wrongly accused of fraud

Published by Simon Read on 07 July 2017.
Last updated on 07 July 2017

Fight for your rights: I’ve been wrongly accused of fraud

Someone contacted Nationwide and claimed that I had made a fraudulent transaction and, as a result, it closed my account. He bought an iPhone 7 from me, but received the black version rather than the jet black handset and, rather than claiming a refund, he reported it as fraudulent. Nationwide didn’t hear my side or allow me to provide any evidence.

I have £2,500 in the account which I can’t access. I was told I need to provide evidence of a £3,000 transfer from my father, which was never reported as fraudulent. I need that money – what rights do I have?

VB/Cardiff

The good news is that VB quickly got his money back. The bad news is that then Nationwide refused to open another account for him.

I had several email exchanges with VB before contacting Nationwide on his behalf to see if he was being treated unfairly. Then the story became murkier.

Nationwide told me: “Our financial crime team took the decision to close VB’s account after he made previous false claims for fraud. Based on the evidence the society has, we are happy the correct decision has been made.”

I put that to VB who said he had been a victim of ATM fraud, for which he had been paid out, and a loan scam, for which he hadn’t.

Further probing revealed he had been turned down by two other banks. Not a good situation to be in.

The problem may well be the fraud claims VB made. I suggest he spends a tenner to see information held about him on the Cifas fraud register (Cifas.org.uk/sf_sars). If the details are wrong, he should get them corrected.

OUTCOME: Reader gets £2,500 back – but bank account is closed

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