Amber Rudd “sceptical” Waspi women hit by state pension age rise will get additional support

18 July 2019

It comes a week after Boris Johnson said he would look at the issue if he becomes Prime Minister

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Work and pensions secretary Amber Rudd has said she is “sceptical” that women affected by changes to the state pension age would get additional funding, according to a report in The Mirror.

The news comes after Boris Johnson said last week that he would take another look at the issue if he were to become Prime Minister.

The decision to raise the state pension age for women has meant that nearly four million women have had to wait longer to get their pension.

Campaign groups such as BackTo60 and Women Against State Pension Inequality (Waspi) argue that many women born in the 1950s were not warned of the changes and have suffered financial hardship as a result.

Speaking at POLITICO’s Playbook Live event in London on Tuesday, the UK work and pensions secretary told the Mirror: “I’m slightly sceptical at holding out hope for any additional support for WASPI women."

"People who feel they have lost out by the rising pension age and claim, believe, they haven’t been told in time about it.

“At the moment the Treasury has been very resistant to supplying any additional funds.”

She said that she was not aware of Mr Johnson’s comments and that she would wait until next week to see if the new Prime Minister takes a different view.

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Secretary of state for work and pensions Amber Rudd

Speaking to his constituents last week, Mr Johnson indicated that he would look at the issue.

He said: “And I must say the answer I’ve got back from the Treasury is not yet satisfactory.

“But I will undertake – if I’m lucky enough to succeed in this campaign – to return to this issue with fresh vigour and new eyes and see what I can do to sort it out."

Debbie de Spon, a spokesperson for Waspi, says: “The Waspi campaign is disappointed to note that the pensions secretary has poured scorn on Boris Johnson's suggestion that he will look again at the Waspi issue.

“We were heartened by his statement, and that of Jeremy Hunt that they will both revisit the situation that finds women born in the 1950s waiting up to an extra six years for their state pension without having received sufficient notice.

“There has been considerable evidence to show that the DWP failed to adequately provide information, and the result for women affected is loss of financial independence and security as they face their retirement. As a campaign we will continue to seek compensation.”

Moneywise has spoken to a number of women born in the 1950s hit by the state pension changes, many of whom have no just suffered financially, but emotionally as well.

Some women stopped working after expecting to receive a pension, but the changes have left them with little time to make alternative plans.

While the government insists it did enough to notify affected women of the changes, many disagree.

The state pension age for women was raised last November to 65 – the same as men – for the first time.

It has been steadily rising from 60 since 2011 and in 2020 the age for both sexes will rise to 66.

Backto60 took the government to the High Court last month for a judicial review.

Two women - Julie Delve, 61, and Karen Glynn, 62 - argued that raising the pension age unlawfully discriminated against them “on the grounds of age, sex, and age and sex combined”.

A final judgment is due within weeks.

Comments

WASPI women

It's called equality as millions of women would never have paid into the pot as a stay at home mom that was still happy to take the child allowance.

In reply to by Keith (not verified)

Waspi

I have been discriminated against by this government both by age,sex and by age and sex. This is unlawful and should be corrected to the letter of the law. My husband has not been discriminated by his sex or his age.

In reply to by Keith (not verified)

Waspi women

Women didn't have the choice men were in charge and women couldn't earn the same as men and were expected to stay at home with the children whether they wanted to or not

In reply to by John Bywater (not verified)

Waspe Women

Well my mum (born in the 40s) certainly had a choice and did earn the same as men, at least from the 60s onwards (or so she tells me).

WASPI women

They had not been told? They should have watched the news instead of soaps

In reply to by Sid (not verified)

No notification

Anne Widdecome said that every woman affected has received a letter notifying of the change. I’ve lived in this home since Jan 89 & I have most definitely NOT had any letter. The only way I’ve learnt about the change of pension is through WASPI & BackTo60, for which I’m grateful. I turned 60 in May this year & was expecting my pension. I was made redundant 2 1/2 yrs ago, only 1 interview in that time & not entitled to benefits, which also sucks.
By the time I get my pension in 6 yrs time I will have missed out on just about £52k. Tell me that is fair.

Pension Age Increase

Grr. So few people seem to understand what the gripe is and, to be honest, some of us didn't get it at first. Speaking for myself, I saw the equality in my pension age being increased to 63 as part of the transition. I thought that was that but, oh no, it was then further increased to 66 so I have been hit by a double whammy despite promises to the contrary. I haven't taken time off for family or had any family allowance but I have had to pay more in contributions due to the fact that I had an earlier retirement date. Great, so I have paid more to retire earlier but that has then been taken away from me ALTHOUGH I HAVE PAID FOR IT!!!!!

In reply to by Cheryl Davies (not verified)

Women's state pension

A above, I started work at 15 yrs old, I am nowv65 yrs old & have never been out of work. I have worked full time, non stop for over 50 years. My claimed my state pension in May this year, as a single woman I do not have financial support from s husband & have never earned enough to have great savings, & the little I have saved has not earned a decent rate if interest for years. My private pension pays me £160 a month due to the years of low interest rates etc & I now have to continue part time work to supplement my income. I can't see a time when I will be able to retire fully

Back to 60

If the High Court Judgement is in favour of returning the pension age back to 60, as a 64 year old woman (born March 1955) does that mean I can retire almost immediately

WASPI women

Not all women were married or had children and worked throughout their careers without a break. These women paid into the system and have been penalised unfairly.

Equality

Years ago when the claim was made for equality on state pension instead of reducing men's pension age to 60 women would have to gradually have their qualifying age increased to same as men's. Surely they knew from then it was going to happen and should have kept themselves up to date on the matter. Can men have the 5 years pension they were done out of due to unequal system when they had to wait until 65 and women 60, how many women never contributed fully to get enough credits and how many claim GPC. Women want equality unless it works against them then they claim to be a special case.

WASPI Women.

Reference Keith's statement - as a husband I would rather my wife recieved her pension at 60 , does Keith not feel that a stay at home mum was helping her husband to be able to work full time and by taking care of HIS children for him enabling his career to progress easier .The child allowance was paid to all families working or not for the child's benefit as its name suggests not the mums.

In reply to by JW (not verified)

WASPI Women

Well my wife received NI (pension) contributions from the government for every year we received child benefit, meaning she was not in any way penalised for taking time off to raise our children. From a purely selfish point of view I'd be quite happy for her to get state pension from age 60, apart from the fact that it will take government funds from other, probably more important, areas in order to fund it.

STATE PENSION

I am a lady born in 1956 like many women of my generation we have been cheated of our state pension how dare they the government prevent us for claiming what is lawfully ours. I have faith in Boris Johnson I am sure he is going to help I am ,however, somewhat apprehensive with what Amber Rudd has up her sleeve, she obviously does not want to find for her fellow sister which is very worrying. Come on Boris make 50's ladies even more proud of you.

In reply to by ISABEL WASSELL (not verified)

State Pension

Being a man born in 1955 I feel part of your pain at having to wait until 2021 for my own State Pension. I was however well aware of the equalisation changes and age increase to 66. I therefore myself made some savings provision, although that was hampered by having no income since 2014 when forced out of the Steel Industry with neither Redundancy nor Company Pension. Your faith in Boris may however be misplaced as his 2 ex-wives found out, he is a proven liar and serial adulterer.

WASPI and Retirement

I am extremely annoyed and angry that my rights to an early Pension were taken away from me despite working all my life even when I had my children, which wasn’t out of choice but to make ends meet. My husband has more than one Pension contributed towards by his employers - the jobs I had didn’t offer this opportunity so yes I do feel I have been discriminated against as I was Mother Housekeeper and Worker and no I haven’t had enough time to accumulate the sort of pensions my husband has had and yes I am excluded from his Pension payments which are to him not me so this law needs changing!

Pension debacle

I was expecting to receive my pension at 63 as was advised previously by dwp.
I have retired from a part time teaching post having worked all my life from 21 to 64 and taken maternity leave to raise a family.
I have 43 years of NI contributions.
I was not made aware of any changes to my pension. I feel angry and aggrieved that I have been treated unfairly and strongly believe women in my position have been unlawfully discriminated against.
I also believe this is an opportunity for Boris Johnson to set the record straight and support women. If he truly believes in the power of Britain against the EU then he needs to put money where his mouth is. Come on Boris get on with it !

Pension debacle

I was expecting to receive my pension at 63 as was advised previously by dwp.
I have retired from a part time teaching post having worked all my life from 21 to 64 and taken maternity leave to raise a family.
I have 43 years of NI contributions.
I was not made aware of any changes to my pension. I feel angry and aggrieved that I have been treated unfairly and strongly believe women in my position have been unlawfully discriminated against.
I also believe this is an opportunity for Boris Johnson to set the record straight and support women. If he truly believes in the power of Britain against the EU then he needs to put money where his mouth is. Come on Boris get on with it !

Pension debacle

I was expecting to receive my pension at 63 as was advised previously by dwp.
I have retired from a part time teaching post having worked all my life from 21 to 64 and taken maternity leave to raise a family.
I have 43 years of NI contributions.
I was not made aware of any changes to my pension. I feel angry and aggrieved that I have been treated unfairly and strongly believe women in my position have been unlawfully discriminated against.
I also believe this is an opportunity for Boris Johnson to set the record straight and support women. If he truly believes in the power of Britain against the EU then he needs to put money where his mouth is. Come on Boris get on with it !

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