Have your say on who features on the new polymer £50 note - but it has to be a scientist

2 November 2018
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The Bank of England has revealed the new £50 note will feature the face of a prominent British scientist, with the public being asked to make nominations over the next six weeks.

To qualify for the shortlist, from which the winner will be selected, the scientist needs to be deceased, as the Bank will not put living people other than the monarch on notes.

Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney will pick someone to feature on the new polymer note from the shortlist and the winner will be announced in 2019 along with a conceptual design.

To have your say, visit the Bank of England's online nomination page here

The governor announced the start of the nomination period at the Science Museum in London this morning.

Mr Carney said: ‘There is a wealth of individuals whose work has shaped how we think about the world and who continue to inspire people today.’

‘Our banknotes are an opportunity to celebrate the diversity of UK society and highlight the contributions of its greatest citizens,’ he added.

Four leading scientists will work with a committee to draw up the shortlist.

You can nominate scientists on the Bank of England’s website.

The Bank have said anyone who has contributed to the fields of pure or applied science will be considered, which includes astronomy, biology, bio-technology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, medical research, physics, technology and zoology. 

Comments

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I recommend 2 men, without whom people's lives the world over would have been different (in a negative way): 1) PERCY HOB ART - he was a designer and engineer of weaponry in the WW2. He was of high military rank, but was demoted to Corporal over a divorce case in which he was cited as Co-Respondent and the lady in that divorce case became his wife. He was pushed into early retirement because he rubbed lots of people the wrong way. Churchill recognised P.H's genius and England's need for his services at this perilous time of WW2 and he was re-instated.Briefly summing up P.H's achievements: without this man and his inventions (tank flame throwers, tank flayling machines etc.) England's and Allied Forces would not have been able to get a foothold on the beaches of the Continent which became one of the theatres of war in WW2. So, he is one of the man to whom we owe our freedom. 2) SIR ALEC JEFFRIES (aged 68 now) who is the "Father of Fingerprinting" and other forensic scientific methods without which our criminal justice system would be so much more challenged to solve cases in, for instance, paternity cases and immigration disputes. NB: Both men 1) & 2) are scientists and well worth England's gratitude and recognition.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate James Clerk Maxwell, a Scottish scientist barely known in the UK but held in high esteem by Albert Einstein who placed him alongside Newton in terms of the greatest scientists of all time.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Stephen Hawkins as well

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Stephen King

In reply to by Gisela Melwani (not verified)

Your number 2 choice of Sir Alec Jeffries is a really good one but your first would not win due to the perceived indiscretion on the divorce case.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Stephen Hawking, or the only female Noble Scientist, (I can't remember her name), anyone but that dreadful woman Thatcher!

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

The person chosen should be an eminent British scientist, chosen purely for their contribution to knowledge and understanding and not on tokenism or political correctness. I would nominate Charles Darwin.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Professor Stephen Hawkings

In reply to by Philip Grant (not verified)

Whole heartily agree.JCM deserves uk recognition.Even better known worldwide than here in Bonnie Scotland.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I should like to nominate James Clerk Maxwell for his theories and formula on electro magnetism which lead to amongst other things many of the electronic devices we take for granted today.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Professor steven hawkins

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

The 2 British people most deserving to be on the new £50 not are Margaret Thatcher, And the Amazing Steven Hawking. Thank you.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Sir David Attenborough.. Full stop. No one has helped us understand our planet more and can influence its future. Noon e matches this man.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Stephen Hawking. Even though he was disabled it did not stop him from continuing with his scientific work, making a huge contribution to the black hole theories and the origins of the universe.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would love to see ADA LOVELACE on the new note. She developed the FIRST computer leading to the technological sciences we cannot do without today.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to chose Steven hawking becuase , even though he had a disability it doesn’t stop him it’s make him even more who he wants to be. Also the amazing science he had done has helped us . So thankyou.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Never heard of most of the nominations,still think Stephen Hawkin should be the One on the New £50!!

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Rosalind Franklin who has been shamefully ignored in the discovery of DNA. Without her work Crick & Watson would not have been able to make great strides in demonstrating the double helix, and receiving the Nobel Prize.Ada Lovelace runs a close second.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Please put Rosalind Franklin of the new £50. She is a worthy scientist who died before she could get the Nobel Prize. She deserves the place as she was very good scientist in the days where women were not allowed in to the Senior common room for lunch.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate James Clerk MAXWELL - the Scottish Einstein.When I discovered he had married into my family in the past I read up on him and was profoundly impressed.Einstein himself revered Maxwell - what more of an accolade could one have!

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Ada Lovelace and Stephen Hawkins as I would like to represent the genders equally. I nominated Stephen Hawkins because he is an inspiration to me and my family and the fact that I have been in the same time line as someone so powerful in the world of science has made me feel proud. I have also nominated Ada Lovelace because in her short life, she had impacted on modern day computer science and mathematics. she could of followed her poetic routes, but instead, followed her own dream. she took a risk as a women, especially in that era.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate, Alan Turing. If ever a person deserved recognition It's him. He and his team, brought the second world war to an end, two years earlier than thought. Instead of being hailed as a hero, he was hounded to suicide.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Eistein should be there.But woiuld like to point out that all these plastic notes, carry germs.! Unless shop assistants wash their hands frequently, these are carry all the bugs that are around in the public domain.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Alan Turing who did as much as anyone towards winning the war and developing computers. He was sadly mistreated and this honour would show respect for his status.in science.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

Havent we learned anything yet? Dont ask the public! Remember ‘Boaty Mc Boatface’ !

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would nominate Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web. For obvious reasons.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Alan Turing, without whom we would not have won WWII

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

ames Clerk Maxwell was one of the brightest scientists in the history of humanity. He was Albert Einstein's hero! But oddly, and quite sadly I think, you'll not find 1 in 100 in this country that have even heard of him, much less have the faintest clue about what he did. I think it says something... It can't be counted as a positive that millions of schoolchildren in this country have completed their studies without having heard of him, but it explains some things. In a city that prides itself on its history, it's beyond peculiar that this statue was only recently emplaced, and is a relatively minor statue in a city which has many. Having shared that opinion, I'll say that the statue is quite a good one. And if you'll look down on the ground beneath the statue, you'll see the discovery for which Maxwell is most well-known: Maxwell's Equations. Maxwell's Equations are a set of "partial differential equations" that provided the foundation upon which our understanding of electromagnetism is built - these relationships have illuminated the path for others to discover radar (which helped England survive Nazi Germany's bombardments), and even the cellphone service peddled by a host of merchants that so many of us depend on for communications. Truly, it would be a different world today had James Clerk Maxwell not done what he did. And once you understand the magnitude of his contribution, you will wonder why the statue is not 300 feet tall.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I think Alan Turing should be recognised on the new £50 note. His work work and commitment shortened the war and saved thousands of lives. Yet he was ostracised because of his saxuality which ultimatly led to him taking his own life.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I hope that Stephen Hawking is on the new £50 note.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Sir Isaac Newton one of the most influential scientists of the modern world . His theory of relativity changed the world we live in. So I think his picture would be very well received on a bank note

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Edward Jenner for his work with cow pox and small pox he must have saved millions of lives over the years never will we see it return a man before his time

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

No Brainer it should be Steven Hawkins on the new £50 note.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Alan. Turing

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

The nomination should be for: Alan Turing.His contribution to science was of enormous value.He saved many thousands of lives.He made a very significant contribution to the Allies winning the War.He was terribly persecuted by the British Legal System and deserves 'real' recognition for his outstanding contribution to our freedom today.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

I would like to nominate Sir Sidney Camm who designed the Hawker Hurricane WW2 fighter plane which paid a very large part in winning the Battle of Britain beside the Spitfire designed by Sir Frank Whittle. He lived in the same village as I did at the time.

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