The best investment funds to boost your children’s savings

19 September 2018
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Investing for children is a careful balancing act. You want their money to grow as fast as they do, but you don’t want to take so much risk that you jeopardise their financial future

Choose the right funds for your offspring’s Junior Stocks and Shares Isa (Jisa) and you’ll put the foundations in place for their financial future.

Make the wrong calls and you risk wasting the opportunity to help them pay for a car, travel the world or put down a deposit on a house.

Of course, there are no guarantees with any investment, but some funds take significantly more risk in their pursuit of top-drawer returns.

We asked four fund experts to provide suggestions for those wanting lower, medium and higher levels of risk – Darius McDermott, managing director of fund rating firm FundCalibre, Patrick Connolly, chartered financial planner at financial advisory firm Chase de Vere, Gavin Haynes, managing director of investment management firm Whitechurch Securities, and Sarah Coles, personal finance analyst at financial provider Hargreaves Lansdown.

Lower risk

Investec Cautious Managed

Mr Connolly likes the multi-asset fund Investec Cautious Managed, and rates the experience of its manager. “Alastair Mundy typically invests 50% in assets, such as shares, which he expects to grow, and 50% in assets, including government bonds and cash, to provide protection. He adopts a contrarian approach by making long-term investments in cheap, out-of-favour companies,” he says.

Jupiter Distribution

Alastair Gunn and Rhys Petheram’s Jupiter Distribution is Mr Haynes’ lower-risk pick. He comments: “This is a defensively managed fund that aims to provide a sustainable income [that can be reinvested] above cash, and modest long-term growth. The fund invests around 65% in bonds managed by Mr Petheram. The remaining 35% of the portfolio is invested mainly in UK yielding equities and is managed by Mr Gunn. The fund is constructed to allow Jupiter to reclaim 20% tax paid on the income distributions for Isa investors.”

Newton Real Return

Mrs Coles recommends Newton Real Return, given its diverse investment mandate. She says: “This flexible fund can invest in a number of things, including shares, bonds and cash. It aims to beat the returns available on cash by 4% a year over any five-year period. It also tries to shelter investments as much as possible during more difficult times.”

Unicorn UK Smaller Companies

Mr McDermott rates the long-term focus of Unicorn UK Smaller Companies. “The UK’s smaller companies have fared well despite Brexit worries because we have some excellent small firms, many that are market leaders, in niche markets. This is a high-conviction fund of around 40 stocks. Its manager focuses on company fundamentals and aims to make long-term investments, while avoiding low quality cash-burning companies. It’s small and flexible, with a solid investment process and a highly competent team.”

Medium risk

Evenlode Income *

Mr Haynes’ top pick for medium-risk investors is Evenlode Income. He comments: “For long-term investors this fund invests in a portfolio of high-quality UK dividend stocks. It’s run by Hugh Yarrow, who has managed the fund since launch in 2009. He focuses on total return, but has consistently yielded in excess of 3% and dividends can be reinvested to boost long-term returns.”

HSBC FTSE All-Share Index

Mr Connolly’s top pick is a tracker fund. He says: “This fund provides broad exposure to the UK stock market by tracking the performance of the FTSE All-Share Index. As a passive fund it’s very cheap, with an ongoing charge of just 0.06%. The largest holdings in the fund will always be the companies with the highest market capitalisation listed in the UK, which currently include BP, British American Tobacco, HSBC and Royal Dutch Shell.”

JOHCM Asia Ex Japan

“The Singapore-based managers invest in companies of all shapes and sizes. The core of the fund is high-quality, sustainable growth stocks (minimum 75%), with up to 25% invested in companies more sensitive to the economy,” says Mr McDermott. He adds: “The managers have experience of past crises and are not afraid to go against the grain in their selections.”

Lindsell Train Global Equity *

Michael Lindsell, Nick Train and James Bullock’s Lindsell Train Global Equity is Mrs Coles’ top pick. She explains: “The fund invests in companies with strong brands and commanding market positions, which have the potential for long-term growth – wherever they are in the world. It’s a very concentrated fund, so your risk is not spread as much as it would be elsewhere, but the focus on big brands and long-term growth reflects the fact that the management team is looking for growth without excessive risk.”

Higher risk

Hermes Global Emerging Markets

Mr Haynes’s higher-risk choice is Hermes Global Emerging Markets, which boasts a ‘seasoned veteran’ in Gary Greenberg at its helm. Mr Haynes says: “For investors taking a long-term approach, who can accept higher levels of volatility, then emerging markets is a good choice for a Jisa. This fund focuses on high-quality names and has a high-conviction approach. It has outperformed its benchmark index, and with lower volatility, over most time periods.”

Lazard Emerging Markets

Following the same theme, Mr McDermott selects Lazard Emerging Markets. He says: “Emerging markets are higher risk, but children will have a long investment time horizon, so can afford to take it. Parents can also invest monthly, to benefit from pound-cost-averaging in these more volatile markets. Lazard uses its 230-strong team of analysts to identify the global brands of tomorrow in developing regions. The team takes a stock selection-based approach to achieve this, as well as using market volatility created by macroeconomic concerns to time trading opportunities.”

Liontrust UK Smaller Companies

Turning to UK-listed companies, Mr Connolly picks Liontrust UK Smaller Companies: “This is a high-risk fund but one which works well for regular investors with a long-term view. It has achieved an impressive track record by focusing on companies which have a sustainable advantage that is difficult for competitors to replicate. This can be a high recurring income, distribution networks, or intellectual property such as brand and culture.”

Marlborough UK Micro-Cap Growth *

Mrs Coles also sticks with a UK fund. She explains: “Marlborough UK Micro-Cap Growth invests in some of the smallest listed companies in the UK, which puts it at the higher-risk end of the spectrum. In the past, the managers have managed to balance strong outperformance with sheltering investors from the worst falls in the toughest times. There are no guarantees that this kind of record will continue in the future, but it underlines the managers’ stock picking expertise.”

* Denotes a Moneywise First 50 fund for beginners investors: see Moneywise.co.uk/first-50-funds.

In reply to by anonymous_stub (not verified)

It’s all very well suggesting these particular funds but financial planning is also a marathon not a sprint and I can’t emphasise enough the importance of ongoing financial advice and reviews. Investing money is like tending a garden you have to revisit and keep it trimmed you can’t just put your money in the Best Buy fund and hope for the best for potentially 18 years. The fund you are suggesting may be fine today but may be gone tomorrow. I do get a little frustrated with recommendations like this as if you were buying potatoes.

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