Your shout: Moneywise readers have their say in July 2018

Published by Hannah Nemeth on 23 August 2018.
Last updated on 24 August 2018

Young boy and grandma putting coins in a jar


Each month we publish the best comments, emails and letters from our readers. Here are the best of July 2018.

Kids need to learn more about personal finance

Moneywise says: We recently reported on research revealing that children who have been taught about money at primary school are better able to save up for things they want than children who have not. One reader says that financial education should go one step further:

Financial education is a vital need for children and should start in primary schools, teaching them about saving up their pocket money for the things they want. Not only does this give them a better understanding of their personal finances, it helps to develop their self-reliance – taking responsibility for their money and the things they buy with it. Not only that, but they are more likely to value those things that they have saved for and take care of them.

Equally important, however, especially when they are a little older, is the need to be taught about public finance. Having some knowledge about income tax, national insurance, VAT, council tax, and so on will help pave the way towards adult responsibilities and enable them to be better prepared when they need to stand on their own two feet.

While many might argue that this is the job of parents, it should not be assumed that youngsters will get all this financial education from parents or other relatives. Indeed, many would be unable to do so. Therefore, it needs to be part of the curriculum to equip youngsters with the knowledge they need when entering the adult world.

Just in case anyone says teachers don’t have the time to do this, I would argue that financial education should take precedence over a few other subjects. What proportion of adults have needed to use simultaneous or quadratic equations in their adult life? Very few, of course, but we all need financial education – so let’s get priorities right.

A/VIA ONLINE COMMENTS

Quitting Tesco over end of price match scheme

Moneywise says: We recently reported that Tesco shoppers will no longer be paid the difference if their goods could have been bought for less at a rival supermarket.

Every week I have shopped at Tesco, knowing the price I paid would be matched to any other supermarket’s prices. That was very reassuring, but lately Tesco has gone insane with price rises weekly now the price match guarantee is being axed. I’ve had enough – I’ll now definitely shop elsewhere.

JJ/VIA ONLINE COMMENTS

I will be leaving Tesco as it keeps putting up prices, and its price match was very good for the products I bought.

DL/VIA ONLINE COMMENTS

Buy to let is the ‘elephant in the room’ of the housing crisis

Moneywise says: A report written by Neil O’Brien MP, which calls for councils to be given powers to build new towns and villages and is damning about buy to let, has had a negative response from readers:

The government has already put measures in to disincentivise buy to let, which will only drive rents up.

All these harebrained political schemes are designed to ‘address’ the first-time buyer issue. But there is no first-time buyer issue. They need to save, but they can’t because if they get a good-salary job, their student loan needs paying back.

CM/VIA ONLINE COMMENTS

“Garden cities – hilarious!” CM wrote. Why not? The idea worked fine in the 1960s with the creation of places such as Milton Keynes. It always amazes me that you can drive around the M25 and there are loads of green fields on either side. Go a bit further afield and Britain still has plenty of room.

D/VIA ONLINE COMMENTS

The housing crisis is about ensuring everybody has somewhere to live, not necessarily owning their own home. In other European countries it is normal and acceptable to rent. Tax private landlords further and, yes, they will withdraw from the market. In the prosperous South East, these houses will be snapped up. However, what you will see in the North is rows of empty houses that landlords won’t buy and individuals can’t afford.

F/VIA ONLINE COMMENTS

Scam watch: cold caller had Moneywise ID

I had a visit from a man purporting to be from your company and wearing Moneywise ID, asking me strange questions about our energy provider. I have been a big fan of your website for many years. Is this caller a genuine employee of yours?

MP/VIA EMAIL

Moneywise says: Thank you for contacting us, so we can warn other readers about this fraudster, as we would never employ cold callers. You may want to report this to Action Fraud at Actionfraud.police.uk.

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