Benefits you're entitled to: state pension age

According to older people's charity Age UK, 16% - or 1.8 million - of pensioners live in poverty, and yet the benefits targeted at this section of society are the most likely to go unclaimed.

The government estimates that around one and a half million pensioners do not claim one of the most important benefits for the retired - Pension Credit - with up to £2.8 billion unclaimed every year. The average amount unclaimed is significant - £1,092 per person, according to the Department for Work and Pensions. Other benefits that also go unclaimed by older people include housing benefit and council tax benefit.

Alison Taylor, director of operations at the Elizabeth Finn Trust, which runs the Turn2us benefits advice service, says that many pensioners are "not aware of the financial support available to them, with eight in 10 of those eligible for Pension Credit simply not taking it up.

"We know that the complexity of the benefits system and perceived stigmas around claiming can deter pensioners from accessing this vital support," she adds. "Yet feedback from our users shows how this extra income can make a huge difference to their quality of life."

The benefits that are on offer change as you get older – with some available to people as young as 50 years old. Help is available to ensure that you claim what you are entitled to. Here is an overview of what you can claim when you reach state pension age.

Benefits at state pension age

Eligibility for many benefits kicks in when you reach the age when you can receive your state pension. Confusingly, though, this age is changing gradually and can be different for men and for women.

The age at which you can claim your state pension now depends upon your gender and your date of birth. If you are a woman and were born before April 6 1950, your state pension age remains 60. If you are younger than this, your state pension age will be greater than 60. If you were born on or after 6 April 1950 but before 6 December 1953, your State Pension age will be somewhere between 60 and 65, depending on your date of birth.

If you were born on or after 6 December 1953 but before 6 April 1978, your State Pension age will be somewhere between 65 and 68 depending on your date of birth. If you were born on or after 6 April 1978, your State Pension age will be 68.

For men born before 6 December 1953, the state pension age is 65. For those born after this date, state pension age rises at the same rate as for women. If you are unsure about when you will reach this age, the calculator at will give you an exact date.

Once you reach your state pension age you may be eligible for the following:

Pension credit

If you are an older person on a low income you may be able to claim Pension Credit to top up your state pension. This is available for women when they reach state pension age. Men can apply for Pension Credit when they reach the state pension age as a woman born on the same day as them.

Pension credit comes in two parts and you may be eligible for one or both:

Guarantee Credit tops up your weekly income to a guaranteed minimum level of £151.20 if you are single or £230.85 if you are a couple. You might get more if you're a carer, severely disabled or have certain housing costs.

Savings Credit is extra money if you've got some savings or your income is higher than the basic State Pension. If you are entitled to it, you could receive £14.82 extra per week if you're single or £17.43 if you're in a couple. The Pensions Credit calculator at will help you to see how much you might be eligible for. Don't be put off claiming even if you are only entitled to a small amount – being in receipt of Pension Credit is a passport to other benefits, so is worth having.

Your entitlement to Housing Benefit and Council Tax Reduction will also be worked out differently once you've reached State Pension age, so you may become entitled to these benefits even if you weren't before. If you receive the Guarantee Credit portion of Pension Credit, you're entitled to free dental treatment, vouchers towards glasses and contact lenses, wigs, and help with the cost of travelling to hospital. You may also get your council tax paid in full.

Cold weather payment

If the average temperature has been‚ or is expected to be‚ 0°C or below for seven days in a row (between 1 November and 31 March) and you are in receipt of Pension Credit, you will automatically receive a Cold Weather Payment of £25 a week.

Winter fuel allowance

Once you have reached state pension age (or if you are a man, the state pension age of a woman born on the same day as you), you are eligible for Winter Fuel Allowance to help you to heat your home. You only need to claim for this once, and then should get it automatically. Winter Fuel payments are £200 if you're under 80 and £300 if you're 80 or over.

For information, call the Winter Fuel Payments Helpline on 0191 218 7610.

This is not means tested and you will receive it whether or not you receive Pension Credit.

Carer's Allowance and the State Pension

Carer's Allowance is worth £62.10 a week and helps you look after someone with substantial caring needs. You don't have to be related to, or live with, the person you care for but you do need to spend at least 35 hours a week caring for them.

Recipients can choose to be paid either weekly (in advance), or every four or 13 weeks. It's worth noting that Carer's Allowance is classified as taxable income, and it can therefore affect your other benefits (for example, if it pushes your level of income over the threshold below which you are due certain other benefits), such as Pension Credit.

Usually, for each week you get Carer's Allowance or the underlying entitlement, you can also get National Insurance credits and contributions to State Second Pension. The credits help to fill in gaps in your National Insurance record (which means you'll still be able to receive the full State Pension and other benefits) although they will stop being paid in the tax year you reach State Pension age, or if you get the underlying entitlement and Widow's Benefit or Bereavement Benefit.

Because you can't normally get two income- replacement benefits (such as, say, Carer's Allowance and State Pension) paid together, an 'overlapping benefit rule' can come into play. If you can't be paid Carer's Allowance because of this rule, you have 'underlying entitlement' to Carer's Allowance instead. It's a tad confusing but it might mean you could get the extra amount for carers in Pension Credit.

If you're in any doubt, visit, speak to a government benefits adviser or contact Citizen's Advice.

Further information

  • Visit for a benefits calculator or call the freephone helpline on 0808 802 2000.
  • Contact for advice specifically aimed at older people or call the freephone number 0800 169 6565.




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Your Comments

So cross at having had my pension deferred for yet another year as I was born in September 53 .The  state pension payment also triggers the free bus pass and the Winter Fuel allowance.Why can't we at least be allowed to claim these two?