How to shop Amazon Prime Day for free

Amazon Prime

Amazon is holding a one-day discounting extravaganza today [Wednesday 15 July] and is promising more deals than Black Friday.

Some of the items that are discounted include the Kindle Fire HD 7, 7" (HD Display, Wi-Fi, 8 GB (Black)) for £59, down from £119, and the Xbox One 1TB with Halo:The Master Chief Collection and Extra Wireless Controller for £329, instead of the usual £400.


The internet giant's 'Prime Day' is happening across the world and is exclusively for Amazon Prime members.

The paid-for Prime service gives customers access to unlimited one-day delivery with no minimum order value, secure unlimited photo storage, Kindle Books they can borrow for free and unlimited instant movie and TV streaming.

It costs £79 a year. However, non-Prime customers can shop today's sale by signing up for a free 30-day of Amazon Prime (which requires payment details to be submitted).

They will be able to enjoy the discounts and benefits outlined above but if they fail to cancel the free trial by the end of the 30-day period they will be charged the annual fee.

To cancel, free trial users will need to sign in to their account and select 'Do not upgrade' in the 'Your Account' section.

It's also possible to shop Amazon Prime Day without signing up for the free trial either – as long as you live with an existing Prime customer or free-trial user. They are allowed to invite up to four guests living at the same address.

Anyone signed up to Amazon Family or Amazon Student can also shop the Prime Day sale but Monthly Prime Instant Video members cannot.

Amazon introduced Prime in 2013 when it cost £49 a year and replaced free delivery on all orders.

In March 2015, the Advertising Standards Authority ordered Amazon to pull a misleading Prime advert that did not make it clear enough that customers signing up to free trial offer would be charged at the end of the trial period if they failed to cancel.


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Even at the recent reduced price Amazon Prime is a rip off in UK at £79 per year, in Germany its only £35.